Monday, May 29, 2017

Memorial Day Memories



My mother, Lavern Croft Joyce, at the tombstone of her parents, Herman Reeves Croft (1896 - 1970) and Nettie C. Vaughn (1897 - 1958) shortly after her mother's burial in Salem Cemetery, Livingston County, Kentucky on Memorial Day 1959.

One of the greatest things we can do for our children is to teach them how they fit into this world – the place created just for them by their ancestors. When I was growing up, parents and children cleaned and decorated family graves together on Memorial Day. With every pulled weed or flower placed on a grave, a memory of each relative was invoked – a nickname, a special trait, the color of their hair and how they fit into the family. I learned about Great Aunt Eddie Vaughn Pittillo and how much I resemble her in appearance. I learned who made the concrete border for little Edith’s grave. I learned that the red hair running through the Joyce family comes from Great Grandmother Mary Ann Smith and that she smoked a pipe and used Star brand tobacco. I also learned that her father, Hugh Wolstenholme, "washed his hands in the clouds" when he crossed the mountains. Those stories should not be forgotten.

By noon we were ready for a break of sandwiches and ice cold drinks, welcome treats as it was sure to be hot and sunny on Memorial Day in southern Illinois and western Kentucky. And then it was back to work and we continued until the grass was trimmed, weeds were all pulled and each grave had a bouquet of flowers stuck in a Mason jar or coffee can. There was a sense of satisfaction when we packed up and headed for home.

I worry that when I am gone, my children will no longer visit the little country cemeteries and, oh, how I hope they don’t forget the stories of their ancestors.

This was originally published on  Rambling Thoughts ... Out of My Mind   http://brendasopinions.blogspot.com/2009/05/memorial-day-memories.html  22 May 2009.

Published 29 May 2017, Western Kentucky Genealogy Blog, http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com/

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Pleasant Grove General Baptist Church and Cemetery

Pleasant Grove General Baptist Church is located in Crittenden County, a few miles north of Salem.


Adjoining the church is the cemetery where many members of my family and other families are buried. These  families include the following: Croft, Corn, Bebout, Lynn, Jones, Millikan, Watson, Miller and Belt,



Published 25 May 2017, Western Kentucky Genealogy Blog,  http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday - Nathan C. Byrd


Nathan C. Byrd
Born
Jan. 14, 1807
Died Sept. 17, 1872
Mark the perfect man and behold
the upright for the end of that man is peace.

Buried Fredonia Cemetery, Caldwell County, Kentucky. Tombstone photographed 12 October 2013.

On 11 January 1838, Nathan C. Byrd obtained a marriage license to marry Miss Sarah Jane Leeper, whose father, R.T. Leeper, gave written consent for the license to be issued.



Original Marriage License
Nathan C. Byrd - Sarah Jane Leeper
Caldwell County Clerk's Office
Princeton, Kentucky

Published 23 May 2017, Western Kentucky Genealogy Blog, http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com/

Friday, May 19, 2017

Epitaphs Can Provide Clues

Have you wondered about the origin of an epitaph on a tombstone? Did it have special meaning to the deceased or the family?  One of the easiest ways to check on the epitaph is to ask our friend, Google. That's what I did with the epitaph on the tombstone of Martha A. Perkins, who is buried in Leeper Cemetery in Livingston County.



 Martha A.
Wife of
J.D. Perkins
Born
Sept. 24, 1827
Died
Apr. 3, 1876
Aged
48 yrs. 6 mo's, 9 da's

"Hard is it from thee to part
Tho it rend my aching heart
Since an heir to glory's gone
Let the will of God be done."

The epitaph is taken from "Psalms and Hymns Adapted to Social, Private and Public Worship of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church."  Could this be a clue to Martha A.'s religious affiliation? Or was this epitaph ordered from a tombstone catalog with little thought given as to whether it was appropriate for the decedent? If charges were made for each letter, an epitaph of four lines would have been fairly costly and certainly more expensive than a simple epitaph like Gone Home or Farewell or Gone But Not Forgotten.

To be most helpful, transcribe every word on the tombstone.

Published 19 May 2017, Western Genealogy Blog, http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday - Mahlon B. Lowery



Mahlon B. Lowery
May 16, 1832
Feb. 15, 1908

Buried Fredonia Cemetery, Caldwell County, Kentucky. Tombstone photographed 12 October 2013.

Malin [sic] B. Lowery is enumerated in the household of John and Grace Lowery on the 1850 Caldwell County, Kentucky census.[1]  John Lowery and Grace Ordway married 22 September 1825.[2] They are buried at Old Fredonia Cemetery .

Mahlon B. Lowery married Miss Lucy C. Rorer 23 December 1869 in Caldwell County.[3] This marriage bond contains quite a bit of information. The groom was 35 years old, was born and currently lived in Caldwell County, was a farmer and this was his first marriage. His father was born in Virginia and his mother was born in New Hampshire.  Miss Rorer, the bride, was age 20, was born in Crittenden County, Kentucky and currently lived in Caldwell County and this was her first marriage. Her parents were born in Virginia. Richard Rorer, father of the bride, gave consent for the marriage license to be issued.







[1] 1850 Caldwell County, Kentucky census, Dist. 1, Family #426, database online, Ancestry.com, accessed 7 March 2017.
[2] Brenda Joyce Jerome. Caldwell County, Kentucky Marriages 1809-1832, (Evansville, IN: Evansville Bindery, 1996), 88.
[3] Brenda Joyce Jerome. Caldwell County, Kentucky Marriages 1866-1873, (Evansville, IN: Evansville Bindery, 2002), 61.

Published 16 May 2017, Western Kentucky Genealogy Blog,  http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com/

Friday, May 12, 2017

Livingston County, Kentucky Tavern Keepers 1866 - 1868

In order to receive a license to keep a tavern in Kentucky, the prospective tavern keeper had to appear before the county court and promise to keep an orderly house, vow not to sell or give liquor to anyone who was intoxicated or was a minor. He also vowed not to permit gaming in his tavern house. The bond was recorded in a separate bond book as well as in the county court minutes in the county court order books.

The following information has been abstracted from Livingston County Tavern Keepers Bond Book 1853 - 1894, Livingston County Clerk's Office, Smithland, Kentucky. The county court order book and page number where the bond is also recorded is found at the end of the entry. For example, M:354 refers to county court order book M, page 354.

Joseph Bridges was granted a license to keep a tavern at his tavern house in Carrsville. 7 May 1866. [M:353]

Phillip Grassham was granted a license to keep at tavern at the brick Tavern in Salem. 7 May 1866. [M:354]

W.W. Phillips and G.W. Crane were granted a license to keep at tavern at the Elliot House in Smithland.  J.T. Crane took the oath required by Law to act as clerk in the Elliot House Hotel. 4 Sep 1866.  [M:373]

J.L. Berry received a license to keep a tavern at Salem. 7 Jan 1867. [M:402]  On motion of J.L. Berry, keeper of a tavern house in Salem, ordered that --- Murphy be permitted to qualify as his clerk. 7 Jan 1867. [M:403]

Thomas Nelson granted a license to keep at tavern at his house in Birdsville. 7 Jan 1867. [M:403]

Joseph Bridges granted a license to keep a tavern at his tavern house in Carrsville. 6 May 1867. [M:420]

Phillip Grassham granted a license to keep tavern at his house in Salem. 6 May 1867. [M:422]

David L. Sanders and J.C. Hodge were granted a license to keep a tavern at the Waverly House in Smithland. 14 Oct 1867.  [M:454]

U.G. Berry was granted a license to keep a tavern at the Bridges House in Carrsville. 4 Nov 1867. [M:456]

John L. Leffler was granted a license to keep a tavern at the Waverly House in Smithland. 6 Jan 1868. [M:476]

Thomas Nelson was granted a license to keep a tavern at his tavern house in Birdsville. 6 Jan 1868. [M:477]

Phillip Grassham was granted a license to keep a tavern at his tavern house in Salem. 4 May 1868. [M:490]



Published 12 May 2017, Western Kentucky Genealogy Blog, http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday - Dr. James G. and Ora Glass




Glass
Dedicated Doctor
Husband
James G.
1882 - 1962

Wife
Ora K.
Dec. 11, 1971

Buried Fernwood Cemetery, Henderson, Kentucky. Tombstone photographed 2 April 2017.

Dr. James Garfield Glass was born in Hopkinsville, Kentucky on 12 November 1882[1] to Edward W. Glass and Sallie MacReynolds .[2]  Dr. Glass graduated from Clark Embalming School in Cincinnati and Meharry Medical College (Walden University) in Nashville, Tennessee in 1908. He was in the undertaking business with his father before practicing medicine, first in Hopkinsville and then moved his  practice to Henderson in 1908.[3]

Ora  Kennedy Glass was born to the Rev. P.H. Kennedy and Virginia Dabney in Henderson about 1895. Her mother was the "first  graduate of a Negro school in Henderson and the first licensed Negro teacher in Henderson."[4]

Dr. Glass and Ora Kennedy were married 6 November 1913. They had two children.[5]




[1] Kentucky Death Certificate #62-20261, accessed 29 March 2017 through Ancestry.com,  gives the birth year for Dr. Glass as 1885.
[2] Ibid.
[3] Frank Lincoln Mather. Who's Who of the Colored Race, Vol. 1  1915,  (Chicago: n.p., 1915), 116.
[4] "70-Year Resident Dies in Henderson," Evansville Press, 6 April 1950.
[5] Who's Who of the Colored Race, p. 116.

Published 9 May 2017, Western Kentucky Genealogy Blog, http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com/